Friday, 28 July 2017 07:50:01

World Rogaining Championships

The 1st World Rogaining Championship was held at Beechworth, Victoria in October 1992, organised by Geoff Hook with course setter David Rowlands. The first world champions were Michael Walters and James Russell, with Andrew and Peter McComb only ten points behind, and Greg Barbour and Eddie Wymer third. International representation included a few from USA and a significant number from New Zealand.

The next World Championship was in August 1996 amongst the everlasting daisies of Mt Singleton, Western Australia and won by James Russell and David Rowlands from Australia.

Sage Orienteering Club organised the 1998 3th World Rogaining Championships at Douglas Lake Ranch, near Kamloops, British Columbia in conjunction with the North American Orienteering Championship. Almost 300 rogainers competed on a day that reached 39.7 degrees.

Peninsula and Plains Orienteering Club staged the 4th World Rogaining Championship 2000 in the North Canterbury region on the South Island of New Zealand, following the Pacific Orienteering Championship in Auckland.

The 5th World Rogaining Championship 2002 was organised by the Czech Association and centred on the small village of Lesna, in the spa region near the western border with Germany.

Tucson Orienteering Club coordinated the 6th World Rogaining Championship 2004 at Big Lake in Arizona, held at over 2500 metres elevation.

7th World Rogaining Championships was held 13-14 October 2006 in Australia in and around the Warrumbungle Mountains within the Warrumbungle National Park and adjacent farm land.

8th World Rogaining Championships was held 13-14 September 2008 in Estonia in the Karula National Park and surrounding areas. The hash house was located near the visitor center of the Karula National Park in a village Ähijärve, in Võru country in South Estonia.

The 9th World Rogaining Championship was held 20-21 November 2010 in New Zealand in hill country near the town of Cheviot, 120 km north of Christchurch.

Past Championships

No Year Date Place Qty of teams Qty of participants Overall winners Results Map Website
1 1992 9-10 October Australia Australia, Beechworth 194 414 Australia James Russell
Australia Michael Walters
Results Map wanted Website does not work
2 1996 31 August - 1 September Australia Australia, Mt Singleton 271 640 Australia David Rowlands
Australia James Russell
Results Map wanted Website does not work
3 1998 4 - 5 August Canada Canada, Kamloops 134 294 Australia Nigel Aylott
Finland Iiro Kakko
Results Map wanted Website does not work
4 2000 15-16 January New Zealand New Zealand, Christchurch 193 410 Australia David Rowlands
New Zealand Greg Barbour
Results Map Website does not work
5 2002 26 - 27 July Czech Republic Czech Republic, Lesna 182 383 Australia David Rowlands
New Zealand Greg Barbour
Results Map Website does not work
6 2004 8-9 May United States of America USA, Arizona 176 380 United States of America Mike Kloser
United States of America Michael Tobin
Results Map Website does not work
7 2006 13-14 October Australia Australia, Warrumbungle 308 677 New Zealand Dennis de Monchy
New Zealand Chris Forne
Results Map Website
8 2008 13-14 September Estonia Estonia, Karula 339 749 Russia Evgeny Dombrovskiy
Russia Pavel Shestakov
Results Map Website
9 2010 20-21 November New Zealand New Zealand, Cheviot 251 522 New Zealand Chris Forne
New Zealand Marcel Hagener
Results Map Website
10 2012 30 August - 1 September Czech Republic Czech Republic, Přebuz 333 700 Estonia Silver Eensaar
Estonia Rain Eensaar
Results Map Website

Future Championships

No Year Date Place Website
11 2013 27-28 July Russia Russia, Pskov region, Alol Website
12 2014 16-17 August United States of America USA, South Dakota Website